California Governor Gavin Newsom has put forward a budget that includes significant cuts to public safety funding, even as the state grapples with a massive deficit and pushes for aggressive climate goals focused on equity.

 

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In his proposed budget, released in May, Newsom highlighted the necessity of “difficult decisions” to address the estimated $27.6 billion deficit expected to persist for years. The proposal includes a $97 million reduction in trial court operations, $10 million from the Department of Justice’s Division of Law Enforcement, and more than $80 million from the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

 

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Florida’s Chief Financial Officer, Jimmy T. Patronis, sharply criticized the budget, calling it the “greatest disrespect of taxpayer’s resources in the history of America.” He attributed the deficit to an exodus of residents and businesses from California, driven by high crime rates and soaring living costs. Patronis noted that California’s stringent environmental regulations have hindered blue-collar businesses, causing economic stagnation.

 

Newsom proposed reallocating funds to climate goals despite the fiscal challenges, including $1.7 billion for equity programs. This move has been met with resistance from some state legislators who oppose the cuts to public safety, particularly a $15 million decrease from the Department of Justice. A video below posted to X earlier this month highlights the rampant crime in the area when an elderly ice cream vendor was viciously attacked in broad daylight:

Newsom’s budget cuts include eliminating 4,600 prison beds across 13 facilities, justified as “population-driven.” Additionally, the proposal includes reducing law enforcement training and cutting $4.4 million from county probation departments.

 

The California State Legislature has until June 15 to approve the budget, set to take effect in July. Meanwhile, San Francisco continues to experience a surge in crime, with over 8,600 thefts reported this year, contributing to the closure of several major retailers.

 

Patronis argued that California’s policies drive businesses and residents away, contrasting this with Florida’s budget surpluses and incentives for law enforcement. He expressed concerns about Newsom’s potential presidential ambitions, warning against his leadership.

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