The infamous Larry Nassar, a convicted child molester and disgraced former sports doctor, was reportedly seeking protection from Mexican gang members through cash payments and “sexual favors” while serving time at a federal prison in Sumter County, Florida, according to an inmate named Grace Pinson. Pinson, who served time with Nassar at the high-security prison, disclosed that Nassar was seen entering a cell with the gang members with the door shut and windows covered, typically indicating sexual activity or drug use.

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Pinson elaborated that Nassar resorted to this arrangement as a means of self-preservation, stating, “Larry Nassar has decided . . . sucking d–k is a better way . . . of staying alive.” Despite being known for sexually abusing hundreds of gymnasts, including prominent Olympians such as Simone Biles and Gabby Douglas, Nassar was described by Pinson as a “scared little church mouse” who mainly left his housing unit to visit the chapel.

According to Pinson, Nassar allegedly paid “a couple hundred dollars a month” to the Mexican gang members for protection during his five years at the Coleman federal prison. Pinson further asserted that the gang members were using this arrangement to force Nassar to engage in degrading actions as retribution for his crimes against young girls. This apparent protection failed to prevent Nassar from facing a near-fatal attack by fellow inmate Shane McMillan, who reportedly stabbed him in his cell in July.

Nassar has since been transferred to a federal prison in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, while the Bureau of Prisons declined to comment on Pinson’s claims about Nassar. Former Coleman prison officers’ union president Jose Rojas expressed skepticism about Pinson’s account, noting that Nassar was held in a unit considered safer than the general population.

Nassar’s despicable actions came to light through the accounts of numerous athletes, including Olympians Aly Raisman and McKayla Maroney, ultimately leading to his sentencing to hundreds of years in prison after pleading guilty to sexually abusing young athletes and possessing child pornography.

Background context in the Larry Nassar saga can be found in the extensive documents below:

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